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One on One

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Make room at the top of your book pile!Make room at the top of your book pile!
[Aug. 19, 2012] The summer is fast coming to an end. And I bet there is a stack of books by your bed or somewhere in your house, ones that you meant to read this summer. But there were just too many other things you had to do. Watch out! Here comes another batch of new North Carolina books, some of which belong at the top of your book pile. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Searching for the real Black Beard and the real JesusSearching for the real Black Beard and the real Jesus
[Aug. 14, 2012] What does North Carolina coastal historian Kevin Dufuss have in common with New Testament scholar Bart Ehrman? If you asked them, each might tell you he is a truth seeker about a man whose life is shrouded in myth. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Separated by slavery, longing to reuniteSeparated by slavery, longing to reunite
[Jul. 16, 2012] “Babies was snatched from their mothers’ breasts and sold to speculators. Children was separated from sisters and brothers and never saw each other again. Course they cry; you think they not cry when they was sold like cattle? I could tell you about it all day, but even then you couldn’t guess the awfulness of it.” These words from a former slave that remind us of one of the great horrors of slavery, the breakup of families, are found in Heather Andrea Williams’s new book, “Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery.” By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Doris Betts and Reynolds Price: Filling the empty spaceDoris Betts and Reynolds Price: Filling the empty space
[Jul. 11, 2012] Who writes for us now? The question came up again with the death of Doris Betts, the beloved teacher and writer, a few weeks ago, reminding us that we have still not gotten used to a North Carolina without Reynolds Price although he died more than a year ago. Even non-readers miss them. Their storytelling wisdom had spread like ripples from their readers and students into a wider audience. Are there other North Carolina writers and teachers to take their places? By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Seven new books every North Carolinian should know aboutSeven new books every North Carolinian should know about
[Jul. 11, 2012] There is no way to read them all. No, and we cannot even know about all of the more than 1,000 books about our state or by authors with North Carolina connections. But every year there are a few books that, for one reason or another, are so important or interesting that we should know at least something about them. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
How did God vote on Amendment 1?How did God vote on Amendment 1?
[Jul. 11, 2012] Where was God in all this, really? North Carolinians heard God speaking in contradictory voices during the weeks leading up to the vote on May 8 when voters approved Amendment 1, which added to the state constitution a provision that “Marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized...” By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
The primary of all primaries - still not overThe primary of all primaries - still not over
[May 4, 2012] Early voting is under way this week in North Carolina’s primary elections. So far there is not much excitement. Sixty-two years ago we had a much different primary and run-off election experience. Voters came out in record numbers. Today, a surprising number of people still remember that election and can tell you how the bitter struggle divided the state. Many of those who “remember” were not yet born in 1950. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Amendment One to Obama’s rescueAmendment One to Obama’s rescue
[May 3, 2012] Amendment One. Whether it wins or loses, the effort to defeat it could be a crucial factor in a successful outcome for the Obama campaign in North Carolina this fall. Prospects for the effort to defeat the proposed marriage amendment to the constitution are still uncertain, notwithstanding a well-organized and impressive effort on the part of the amendment’s opponents. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
My coach did not spit on anybody’s handMy coach did not spit on anybody’s hand
[May 3, 2012] It is too bad that sports reporters and historians at Atlantic Coast Conference headquarters are not reading “ACC Basketball.” This UNC Press book by Sam Walker was published last year and chronicles the game during the conference’s first 20 years. On the other hand, maybe it is a good thing for my old basketball coach, Lefty Driesell. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
The pain of losing a town’s only factoryThe pain of losing a town’s only factory
[Apr. 29, 2012] “You ain't never going to understand until you've been through it.” Politicians from the president on down will hear this plaintive statement when they campaign in North Carolina this year. It will happen when they talk about jobs and their plans for economic recovery in towns that have lost the furniture factories or textile mills on which those towns were built. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
There goes my Britannica statusThere goes my Britannica status
[Mar. 21, 2012] It was a great run.

You know what I am talking about. Since the news about the end of the Encyclopaedia Britannica’s print edition, writes Scott Hollifield, editor of the McDowell News, “Writers and commentators havewaxed nostalgically on the demise of these revered tomes of knowledge in the wake of the digital revolution.” By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
We got trouble right here in River CityWe got trouble right here in River City
[Sep. 27, 2011] North Carolinians outside the Research Triangle region (“Triangle”) envy its economic success and cultural assets. But don’t get too jealous. The very success of the Triangle brings challenges that, if unmet, will topple the Triangle’s place as North Carolina’s capstone example of successful economic development. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Is Rick Perry “roast” in North CarolinaIs Rick Perry “roast” in North Carolina
[Sep. 27, 2011] “After what he said about our barbecue, he is a dead duck in North Carolina.” A Democrat was celebrating the report that Texas Governor Rick Perry once made a disparaging remark about our favorite food. According to a news report that quoted one of my favorite books, “Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue” by John Shelton Reed and Dale Volberg Reed, Perry, when he ate Eastern North Carolina barbecue in 1992, said, “I’ve had road kill that tasted better than that.” By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
In the shadow of Cold Mountain, a real InmanIn the shadow of Cold Mountain, a real Inman
[Aug. 21, 2011] Driving south on Lake Logan Road, in the Pigeon River Valley and the shadow of Cold Mountain, headed towards Inman’s Chapel the other day, I could not help wondering whether or not the Inman in Charles Frazier’s “Cold Mountain” was a real person. The dedication of a highway marker at Inman’s Chapel that day gave me some idea that somebody named Inman was important enough to have a chapel named after him. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
An aerotropolis in North Carolina?An aerotropolis in North Carolina?
[May 26, 2011] But what about North Carolina airports? How do our major airports and associated metropolitan areas fit into the concepts for the future of the world’s mega airport cities discussed in the new book, “Aerotropolis: The Way We'll Live Next” by UNC-Chapel Hill’s John D. Kasarda and Greg Lindsay? Does any one of our “airport cities” have the potential to be a real “aerotropolis”? By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine

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