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One on One

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North Carolina's Sandhills -- The perfect place for the perfect peachNorth Carolina's Sandhills -- The perfect place for the perfect peach
[Jul. 1, 2005] One of the great joys of summertime for many North Carolina families is a drive to the Sandhills to visit one of the roadside peach stands that dot the region. One reason these peach outings are so popular is that the Sandhills are such a short distance from North Carolina’s largest cities. The region is a little more than a one-hour drive from Charlotte, the Triad, or the Triangle areas--just the right distance for a one-day family trip. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Promoting North Carolina Books (and my favorite TV program)Promoting North Carolina Books (and my favorite TV program)
[Jun. 27, 2005] Every now and then you all let me promote my favorite TV program, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch. The program, which I am honored to host, begins a new series this Sunday (July 3) at 5:00 p.m. The leadoff episode features Shannon Ravenel, the famed editor at Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, discussing “New Stories From the South 2005,” her 20th volume in an annual series. Each year she selects the best short stories set in our region and compiles them into “New Stories.” By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Our governors -- How quickly we forgetOur governors -- How quickly we forget
[Jun. 20, 2005] Who remembers Governor Luther Hodges? Very few of us. At least that is the word from his son. When Luther Hodges Jr. was growing up, he had to get used to being called “Little Luther.” Even when he had made a name for himself as a top executive at NCNB and as a prominent political leader, he had to answer questions like, “Are you kin to the real Luther Hodges?” By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
For North Carolinians, the "must-see" place in ShanghaiFor North Carolinians, the "must-see" place in Shanghai
[Jun. 13, 2005] Shanghai, China. What are the “must-see” places for a North Carolinian to see in this vibrant center of Communist China’s exploding capitalistic enterprise? It depends on the person you ask. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
China's most serious challenge to us -- not what you'd expectChina's most serious challenge to us -- not what you'd expect
[Jun. 6, 2005] Let me tell you what I think will be China’s greatest challenge to our country in the upcoming years. I am sitting here in the student cafeteria at Tsinghua University in Beijing. I am eating a tasty lunch meal of dishes chosen from hundreds of possibilities in the modern cafeteria line. Meats, rice, soup, cabbage, dumplings, a big bottle of beer and more. I paid for all of this quickly and efficiently with an electronic card that I purchased for about $1.20. I have almost enough credit left on the card to buy a similar meal tomorrow. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
This summer's beach reading -- a book about the beachThis summer's beach reading -- a book about the beach
[May 30, 2005] Duke professor Orrin Pilkey has written a book that ought to be in the suitcase of every person headed for a beach vacation this summer. Pilkey is well known to beach front property owners as the man who wants to keep them from protecting their beach related investments by asking such questions as, “But why should we pay a huge price to save the property of a small number of people who were so ignorant or arrogant that they built right next to an eroding shoreline? By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Does the South fit in a "global world"?Does the South fit in a "global world"?
[May 23, 2005] How do you describe in a few words the dramatic post World War II changes to our Southern region? We are no longer the segregated, inward-looking “backwater” of our country, as many of our fellow Americans viewed us until recently. Nor are we bound so tightly to our special history as a defeated country or to the strong sense of place that set our people apart. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Some laws we enforce, some we don't. So what?Some laws we enforce, some we don't. So what?
[May 16, 2005] Over the weekend news reports reminded us that North Carolina law makes local poker playing contests illegal. Those who participate are, according to the law, criminals. The same rules would apply to most of the informal games of chance some of us enjoy from time to time. The common office pool on the NCAA basketball tournament may be the activity that makes more North Carolinians common criminals than any other. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
A rogue history of North CarolinaA rogue history of North Carolina
[May 9, 2005] Where should I go to learn about North Carolina history? Folks ask me that question a lot. Sometimes they want me to recommend books. Sometimes they want to know teachers, or speakers, or just people they can visit face to face. Around Chapel Hill, one of the best "people to visit" is my neighbor H.G. Jones. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Rip Van Winkle and the lotteryRip Van Winkle and the lottery
[May 2, 2005] It is May 15, 2015. I just woke up. I feel great, but my wife tells me I have been in a coma for the past 10 years. My wife is helping me remember what happened on that day - the day I went into the coma. She says that I got real angry when I learned that the leaders of the legislature were going to push through the state lottery as part of the budget bill. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Political lessons from a Senator under presurePolitical lessons from a Senator under presure
[Apr. 25, 2005] Some North Carolinians feel that competition from Chinese manufacturers is a big reason why they or some of their friends have lost their jobs recently. If they are right, part of the problem might have started right back here in North Carolina more than a hundred years ago. I found out about this close connection between China and North Carolina as a part of a Chinese language course that I am taking at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC-Chapel Hill. By D. G. Martin
Also: NC Book Watch
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Charlie Soong -- North Carolina's link to China's historyCharlie Soong -- North Carolina's link to China's history
[Apr. 18, 2005] Some North Carolinians feel that competition from Chinese manufacturers is a big reason why they or some of their friends have lost their jobs recently. If they are right, part of the problem might have started right back here in North Carolina more than a hundred years ago. I found out about this close connection between China and North Carolina as a part of a Chinese language course that I am taking at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC-Chapel Hill. By D. G. Martin
Also: Our State Magazine
 
The Lottery, Act 2: It's not over until it's overThe Lottery, Act 2: It's not over until it's over
[Apr. 11, 2005] "So, the lottery passed the House. When can we buy our tickets?" Some people were asking this question last week after the North Carolina House passed a bill that would establish a state run lottery. The vote was 61 for and 59 against. Folks who watch North Carolina politics give the political skills of House Speaker Jim Black credit for the result. Somehow, he gained the support of several legislators who had previously opposed the lottery. By D. G. Martin
Also: Our State Magazine
 
The "Reeducation Lottery" - not worth "selling out" forThe "Reeducation Lottery" - not worth "selling out" for
[Apr. 3, 2005] North Carolina legislators are poised to sell out. It is really not such big news when politicians sell out by giving up an important principle or position in return for something else that seems more important. Selling out is part of the marketplace of representative government where, in order to achieve some important goals, a politician has to compromise on other, perhaps less important, ones. By D. G. Martin
Also: Our State Magazine
 
Discretionary funds: Who's responsible?Discretionary funds: Who's responsible?
[Mar. 28, 2005] Who is responsible for the "discretionary funds" we have been reading about-the ones are budgeted to state agencies with the understanding that certain legislative leaders would direct how they would be spent? We blame the politicians, of course. By D. G. Martin
Also: Our State Magazine

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