This website is accessible to all versions of every browser. However, you are seeing this message because your browser does not support basic Web standards, and does not properly display the site's design details. Please consider upgrading to a more modern browser. (Learn More).

You are here: home > news > agriculture

Agriculture

Page 2 of 9     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Chatham County 4-H'er was among top winners at the annual state 4-H Congress in RaleighChatham County 4-H'er was among top winners at the annual state 4-H Congress in Raleigh
[Jul. 9, 2013] This year's 4-H Congress, held June 22-25, attracted 521 youth and their adult leaders for activities including presentations on a variety of subjects, leadership and citizenship training, service opportunities, officer elections and more. This year's congress was moved from its traditional late July time slot and combined with another 4-H event, Citizenship Focus, which allows 4-H'ers to engage with their elected leaders in the N.C. General Assembly.
 
Celebrate National Pollinator Week with a virtual garden tourCelebrate National Pollinator Week with a virtual garden tour
[Jun. 23, 2013] June 17-23, 2013 is the seventh Annual National Pollinator Week as designated by the U.S. Senate and proclaimed by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. It's exciting to see how nationwide the public interest and awareness in pollinators has grown significantly over the past few years. I feel like here in Chatham County, every week is Pollinator Week because it has been a big passion of mine for years and I do alot of educational programming around this topic. By Debbie Roos
 
Northwood agricultural classes and FFA win at the North Carolina State FairNorthwood agricultural classes and FFA win at the North Carolina State Fair
[Nov. 9, 2012] On Thursday, October 11, chickens from the Northwood agricultural classes and FFA participated in poultry show at the North Carolina State Fair in Raleigh. Six hens and one rooster placed. Agricultural classes raised the birds from biddies. Great care was provided to maintain herd health and growth.
 
Five state champion trees designated in Chatham CountyFive state champion trees designated in Chatham County
[Aug. 27, 2012] Walton Haywood, chair of Grand Trees of Chatham has been advised that four newly recognized state champion trees have been recognized in Chatham County bringing the county total to five. Alan Moore of the North Carolina Forest Service, in an email to Haywood, indicated that the four trees were nominated by someone from Virginia who submits frequent nominations. By Al Cooke, Extension Agent, Horticulture
 
Chatham County seeks residents to serve on Agriculture Advisory CommitteeChatham County seeks residents to serve on Agriculture Advisory Committee
[Jun. 24, 2012] Chatham County residents involved in agriculture, agribusiness and related fields are invited to apply for openings on the Agriculture Advisory Committee. Several seats are available for one to three-year terms.
 
Workshop on farming with heritage breeds of livestock and poultry set for May 4-5Workshop on farming with heritage breeds of livestock and poultry set for May 4-5
[Apr. 12, 2012] Join the Farmer Veteran Coalition (FVC) and the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy (ALBC) May 4 – 5, 2012, for a two-day workshop that will help transform today’s veterans into tomorrow’s farmers. This first-of-its kind workshop will educate and train America’s service men and women on the skills necessary to steward some of America’s most historic and endangered farm animals. By Jeannette Beranger
 
Asian lady beetles begin their search for safe winter harbor with cooling fall weather
[Nov. 20, 2011] Asian lady beetles begin their search for safe winter harbor with cooling fall weather. To them the sunny side of light-colored buildings seems ideal, although dark colors as well as brick or stone will do. Scientists speculate that some chemical cues (such as the scent of last year's visiting lady beetles) may lure them to sites previously used. By Al Cooke
 
Chatham nonprofits urged to apply for farmland preservation grantsChatham nonprofits urged to apply for farmland preservation grants
[Nov. 4, 2011] Chatham County nonprofits interested in farmland preservation may be eligible for grants through the N.C. Agricultural Development and Farmland and Preservation Trust Fund, according to Brenda Williams, director of the Chatham County Soil & Water Conservation District. The deadline for submitting applications is 5 pm on December 15. By Debra Henzey
 
The Cooperative Extension way of "taking the fire out of fire ants"The Cooperative Extension way of "taking the fire out of fire ants"
[Sep. 28, 2011] We would like to respond to Virginia Mary Jacks' strategy for managing fire ants and her wish that "the extension office would remind us of our options to go green!!" We're pleased that she has found the pleasure of watching her rooster's amusement with fire ants. Our sign-in records don't give any indication that she attended our program on fire ants last week, so she may not be in the best position to evaluate whether any of the options we suggested are green. But she does open the door for us to reach a broader audience via the Chatlist. By Sam Groce
 
Register now for non-native and invasive forest plants workshops for landownersRegister now for non-native and invasive forest plants workshops for landowners
[Aug. 1, 2011] The Non-native and Invasive Forest Plants Workshops for Landowners is a series of six free one-day educational workshops (choose one to attend that is closest to you) featuring presentations by experts in non-native invasive plants that impact North Carolina's forests. Each workshop will engage regionally based stakeholder groups in the planning and educational content. By Debbie Roos
 
Yellow jackets are considered beneficial in that other insects are a major part of their dietYellow jackets are considered beneficial in that other insects are a major part of their diet
[Jul. 20, 2011] A forestry professional recently emailed to report and inquire if I was getting more reports of unusual numbers of yellow jacket nests. I hadn't, but that was the only the first report. There have been others now. And this past weekend I too followed a mower across a nest. It's not the first time that has happened nor even the worst. But three stings were enough to send me inside to slap on cold packs for a while. Now I've marked the spot and finished mowing. By Al Cooke
 
Controlling bald-faced hornets and yellowjackets in and around structuresControlling bald-faced hornets and yellowjackets in and around structures
[Jul. 20, 2011] The term "hornet" is often used to refer to many of the wasps that build large papery nests. The most notable paper wasp is the baldfaced hornet, Dolichovespula maculata, and several species of yellowjackets (Vespula sp.), which are really wasps. In actuality the only true hornet found in the United States is the European hornet,Vespa crabro L. By Stephen B. Bambara and Michael Waldvogel
 
Twitching cocoons on a Leyland cypress are probably bagwormsTwitching cocoons on a Leyland cypress are probably bagworms
[Jul. 16, 2011] “Twitching cocoons” on a Leyland cypress are probably bagworms. The cocoon is generally broadest in the center, narrowest on both ends, and covered with vegetation from the host plant. Bagworms occur throughout North Carolina. Bagworms are usually found on conifers such as arborvitae, spruce, juniper, cedar, and Leyland cypress. However, bagworms have a very wide host range and can feed on many plant species including deciduous trees and shrubs. By Al Cooke
 
During the summer be intelligent in your water useDuring the summer be intelligent in your water use
[Jun. 17, 2011] It’s always fascinating to me to hear people talk about water about this time of year. I once spoke with a man who felt pretty sure he was applying at least an inch of water; when I got him to measure it, he found that he was applying less than 1/10 inch. People ring my phone occasionally to describe what sounds like a plant experiencing water deficit. When I mention water, sometime I hear “but we’ve had a lot of rain.” And this time of year rain can be spotty. By Al Cooke
 
Growing fig trees in North CarolinaGrowing fig trees in North Carolina
[May 16, 2011] Newcomers have shown a great deal of interest in our homegrown figs. Late fall or early spring is a good time to plant a fig tree and should be successful in our area if the soil is well-drained and fertile. Climate and nematodes would be the only problems, and nematodes will be discussed further down. As always we suggest you take a soil sample and follow instructions for your site. By Nancy Lehto

Page 2 of 9     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

 
News

Free Classifieds

Got Feedback?
Send a letter to the editor.

Subscribe
Sign up for the Chatham Chatlist.

Advertise
Promote your brand at chathamjournal.com





Google
ChathamJournal Web



Subscribe now: RSS news feed, plus FREE headlines for your site